Executive Director
W.P. Carey School of Business

Mark Stapp is the Executive Director of the Master of Real Estate Development Program, the Director of The Center for Real Estate Theory and Practice and the Fred E. Taylor Professor of Real Estate in the W.P. Carey School of Business at ASU. He has also served as a faculty associate in the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at ASU. In November 2011, Mark was named a Distinguished Fellow of NAIOIP. He currently serves on the boards of Local Initiatives Support Corporation Phoenix; Valley of the Sun YMCA and Valley Forward Association. He is a member of the Provosts Advisory Council for Arizona School of Health Sciences and Oral and Dental Health, serves as co-chair of the Academic Research Committee of ICSC, a member of ICSC’s North American Research Task Force and is on the Editorial Board of the Homburg-Oxford University Press. Stapp is the Managing Member of Pyramid Community Developers, LLC, an investment and development firm of projects throughout the US and provider of asset management and design consultation services. He was President, US operations, Naef International Management, from 1995 to 2007. From 1990 to 2000, he served as Chairman of the Board of Taliesin Architects, Inc., and founded and operated First City Homes, which he sold in 1998. He was Vice President of Planning and Development Services for Lendrum Design Group, served as Managing Director of Mountain West Research and was Senior Vice President of The Ellman Companies. Stapp’s undergraduate studies are in environmental studies and urban design at William Paterson University; his graduate work is in urban economics at ASU and the Stanford University Graduate School of Business Executive program. In 2007, he received a Doctor of Humane Letters from A.T. Still University, for his work in community sustainability, health and wellness.

Speaking at the Following:

Mar 28

Tuesday, March 28, 2023

Seizing the Missing Middle Moment

1:30pm – 3:00pm

Buildings and developers across the country are integrating Missing Middle Housing product types such as cottage courts, fourplexes, and townhouses into their projects to respond the perfect storm of rising costs, shifting household demographics, including a rapidly aging population, and demand for non-single family housing choices in walkable urban locations. ULI’s publication, “Attainable Housing,” identified […]